Retrophisch is dead. Long live Retrophisch.

For more than a year I’ve been thinking about redesigning the blog. I know, I know, I haven’t really blogged that much of late, but still, I’ve been giving it some thought.
Given that this is a not-for-profit venture that’s really more for me than anyone else–though I truly appreciate your patronage–I could not justify paying someone to do the redesign for me, though I have numerous friends I would love to have do it for me.
The redesign thought process had me examine my blogging platform as well. I’ve been with Movable Type for quite a while, nearly a decade. This blog is currently on version 4.2 of the software, with 5.1 on the cusp of release. Were I to stay with Movable Type, it would behoove me to upgrade, and take on the learning curve of the changes made with version 5.
WordPress, of course, is the hot ticket in the blogging world right now, and has an impressive and extensive theme ecosystem, making a redesign a theoretically simpler affair. My friend Tom has been using Tumblr for two years, and has been pretty happy with it, the service’s massive outage five months ago notwithstanding.
It was precisely Tumblr’s outage, and my Type A-control freak personality, which had me pushing Tumblr and similar service Posterous to the bottom of my choices.
Then there was the decision of export/import. Did I want to take nine years worth of Movable Type blog posts and import them into a new blogging system?
Conveniently, I had another domain name I could use. Since assuming the Retrophisch moniker, I’ve had the .net and .org domains pointing to the .com. About two years ago, I had the bright idea to seek out a shortened domain, one ending in .ch. This necessitated a visit to the Swiss registrar SWITCH, as at the time no U.S.-based registrar was offering Swiss domain purchases. In a matter of minutes, retrophis.ch was mine. It, too, went up as a redirect to the original retrophisch.com.
Now, I find myself with a domain different enough, yet still the same, I could simply “flip the switch” with: start over, with no importing. The old blog will reside as it always has, and go into archival mode.
So one part of the decision-making process was done. Now, back to the question of the engine, the content management system, or CMS, as it’s called. I ended up leaning toward Posterous, then Control-Freak Me decided on WordPress.
Only it was not to be: WordPress’ “famous five-minute install” went off without a hitch, but I kept running into a glitch with the setup. While Control-Freak Me was running this down, I-Just-Want-To-Post-Content Me was getting really annoyed, and went off exploring other options yet again.
Finally, I decided to move to Tumblr. Yes, there is a chance the service will go down again. Yet there’s just as much of a chance of a flash flood taking out my friend Jim’s server where this site resides. Stuff happens.
So from this moment forward, new stuff will be there, at Retrophis.ch. Point your browsers, and feed readers if that’s how you roll, there. This joint’s being boxed up and rolled off into the giant Internet storage warehouse.
Thanks for stopping by. Hope to see you over at the new digs.

links for 2011-04-18

Takers, Not Makers

Stephen Moore, WSJ:

If you want to understand better why so many states–from New York to Wisconsin to California–are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy, consider this depressing statistic: Today in America there are nearly twice as many people working for the government (22.5 million) than in all of manufacturing (11.5 million). This is an almost exact reversal of the situation in 1960, when there were 15 million workers in manufacturing and 8.7 million collecting a paycheck from the government.

It gets worse. More Americans work for the government than work in construction, farming, fishing, forestry, manufacturing, mining and utilities combined. We have moved decisively from a nation of makers to a nation of takers. Nearly half of the $2.2 trillion cost of state and local governments is the $1 trillion-a-year tab for pay and benefits of state and local employees. Is it any wonder that so many states and cities cannot pay their bills?

links for 2011-03-10

  • An infographic "using groups designated by the United States Department of State. Drawing on other data we have added several associated characteristics, including geographic location, approximate level of attacks (total), approximate size of organization by members, status of activity, and the age of the group."

    Courtesy of Navanti, a client of my friend Tom.

links for 2011-02-10